Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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C69
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by C69 »

Clinical trial results show the drugs reduce risk of death by 24% for critically ill patients and time spent in intensive care by up to 10 days.

Published 7 January 2021
From:
Department of Health and Social Care

Patients in intensive care units across the UK are to receive potentially life-saving treatments for COVID-19
Government ensures life-saving drugs will be available in NHS healthcare settings with immediate effect
Patients across the UK who are admitted to intensive care units due to COVID-19 are set to receive new life-saving treatments which can reduce the time spent in hospital by up to 10 days, the government has announced today (Thursday 7 January).

Results from the government-funded REMAP-CAP clinical trial published today showed tocilizumab and sarilumab reduced the relative risk of death by 24%, when administered to patients within 24 hours of entering intensive care.

Most of the data came from when the drugs were administered in addition to a corticosteroid, such as dexamethasone – also discovered through government-backed research through the RECOVERY clinical trial – which is already provided as standard of care to the NHS.

Patients receiving these drugs, typically used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, left intensive care between 7 to 10 days earlier on average. The rollout of these treatments could therefore contribute significantly towards reducing pressures on hospitals over the coming weeks and months.

Updated guidance will be issued tomorrow by the government and the NHS to trusts across the UK, encouraging them to use tocilizumab in their treatment of COVID-19 patients who are admitted to intensive care units, effective immediately.

Supplies of tocilizumab are already available in hospitals across the UK and clinicians will be able to treat all those admitted to intensive care units, potentially saving hundreds of lives. The department is working closely with Roche, who manufacture tocilizumab, to ensure treatments continue to be available to UK patients.

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said:

The UK has proven time and time again it is at the very forefront of identifying and providing the most promising, innovative treatments for its patients.

Today’s results are yet another landmark development in finding a way out of this pandemic and, when added to the armoury of vaccines and treatments already being rolled out, will play a significant role in defeating this virus.

We have worked quickly to ensure this treatment is available to NHS patients without delay, meaning hundreds of lives will be saved.

I am hugely proud of the significant role our NHS and its patients have played in this international trial, and grateful to the outstanding scientists and clinicians behind REMAP-CAP who have brought this treatment to our patients.

Deputy Chief Medical Officer Professor Jonathan Van-Tam said:

This is a significant step forward for increasing survival of patients in intensive care with COVID-19. The data shows that tocilizumab, and likely sarilumab, speed up and improve the odds of recovery in intensive care, which is crucial for helping to relieve pressure on intensive care and hospitals and saving lives.

This is evidence of the UK’s excellent research infrastructure and life sciences industry advancing global understanding of this disease, which we have done both through our own programme of clinical research and through our ability to make very large contributions to international studies.

In June last year, the UK government approved dexamethasone as the world’s first treatment proven to reduce mortality for COVID-19. The REMAP-CAP trial found that the rate of death for those in intensive care units on corticosteroids, such as dexamethasone, and respiratory support alone was 35%, which was reduced to 28% when tocilizumab was also administered.

The government continues to work in partnership to ensure global equitable access to safe and effective treatments. Only multilateral collaboration can deliver at the speed and scale needed to end the global pandemic, and the government remains committed to participating in international trials such as this that seek to answer important questions about the virus.

The UK has played an integral role in these international efforts: three-quarters of patients enrolled globally have been NHS patients, in 142 hospitals across the UK – roughly half of the 289 total sites across the world. A quarter of all patients in intensive care with COVID-19 have enrolled and continue to volunteer to enrol in the REMAP-CAP trial – all of whom have made a vital contribution to the research needed to beat this disease.

Support also came from the UK’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), its well-established Clinical Research Network and the UK’s Chief Medical Officers. The UK government has, to date, provided £1.2 million to support the REMAP-CAP trial.

Professor Stephen Powis, NHS national medical director, said:

The fact there is now another drug that can help to reduce mortality for patients with COVID-19 is hugely welcome news and another positive development in the continued fight against the virus.

This signals how the NHS is working all the time to find new treatments and therapies, but the best advice for individuals is to remember the hands, face, space guidance.

Background information
The REMAP-CAP analysis has not yet been peer-reviewed.

Tocilizumab is administered intravenously in a one or two-dose regime. It has been demonstrated to be effective for patients requiring organ support when administered soon after admission to ICU.

Other trials such as the RECOVERY trial are assessing efficacy in wider patient groups outside of intensive care settings, but these are still ongoing. REMAP-CAP has not tested the effectiveness of tocilizumab in primary care settings.

Tocilizumab will be used to further reduce mortality from COVID-19 and in addition to dexamethasone, which is already standard of care for hospitalised patients receiving supplemental oxygen.

Tocilizumab and sarilumab have already been added to the government’s export restriction list, which bans companies from buying medicines meant for UK patients and selling them on for a higher price in another country. This will protect supply for UK patients by enforcing regulatory action on those who flout the restrictions.

The REMAP-CAP trial showed that mortality was 35.8% for patients receiving current standard of care alone, and that this was reduced to 27.3% using tocilizumab and sarilumab. This was a 24% relative reduction in risk of mortality for patients who entered intensive care.
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message #2527204
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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hermie wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 4:01 pm
dinsdale wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 3:56 pm
hermie wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 3:49 pm
Leinster in London wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 3:40 pm
hermie wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 3:29 pm
Not among frontline and essential workers. Plus you can't lock down entire nations for the best part of a year while vaccines are rolled out.

I'm not saying I agree with it but it's an interesting subject. Targeting superspreaders is by far the quickest way out of this. And let's not forget that time is of the essence, not just from an economic or social well-being standpoint, the more time the virus is slushing around the more it can mutate, become more virulent or elusive etc.
These super spreaders you mention, are they the ones wearing jeans, or are they identified by the colour tie they wear?
You do it by identifying people with a large amount of social contacts. Interesting piece on it here:
In 2003, during the first SARS epidemic, Shlomo Havlin, a physicist at Bar-Ilan University near Tel Aviv, proposed one of the most ingenious solutions to this problem. In a paper called “Efficient Immunization Strategies for Computer Networks and Populations,” Havlin and two colleagues argued that you could achieve global effects on a complex network using only local knowledge. All you had to do was follow a simple script: Take a random sample of a population, ask each individual to name a single acquaintance, and vaccinate the acquaintance. “In this way,” Havlin says, “you can reach the hubs, the super-spreaders, very easily.”

This acquaintance immunization strategy wasn't as efficient as one that targeted the most highly connected nodes based on complete knowledge of a network. But it was close. “If you do this,” Havlin says, “you reduce the number of units that you need to immunize by a factor of three or four.” Diseases that would normally keep spreading until 60 or 80 percent of the population was infected—the herd immunity threshold—could be stopped by vaccinating just 10 or 20 percent. Havlin likens the effect to a phase transition: A solid network of ice crystals melts suddenly into water.

Acquaintance immunization works because of a phenomenon known as the friendship paradox, which holds that, on average, your friends have more friends than you do. The very act of asking someone to choose a friend, any friend, played out over hundreds or thousands of iterations, leads inevitably to the most connected people. Consider, for example, a very simple network of three people from Casablanca, Morocco: Rick, Ilsa, and Louis. Ilsa and Louis both know Rick, but they don't know each other. If you ask each of them to name a friend, two out three times you wind up with the most-connected person: Rick.
https://www.wired.com/story/covid-19-va ... spreaders/
That's an interesting variation of the travelling salesman problem. Finding the optimal route is really hard. Finding a nearly optimal route is quite easy.
Yep exactly. Everyone you vaccinate get them to nominate someone, you'll occasionally go down dead ends but you'll get the key nodes in the network quickly that way.
Unfortunately, with everyone on lockdown, it's not the most connected that will be the greatest spreaders, it will be a subset that ignore lockdown. Also you can't tie them down and force them to be vaccinated.
It's still unknown whether the vaccine prevents transmission, so vaccinating the group with the greatest percentage of people dying or being hospitalised has to be the main strategy.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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Gospel wrote: Wed Jan 06, 2021 6:39 pm
Openside wrote:I guess its up to various countries how they do it, maybe they reason the elderly don't mix much etc. God knows no one seems to know the right way to deal with this thing. Its all guesswork to a greater or lesser degree :|
Surely you vaccinate according to the mortality rate? Isn't that medical doctrine? Under 40s are a very low risk group. Due to the EU vaccine procurement disaster there's a very real danger they're going to run out of doses.
Maybe they've got a supply of that sanofi vaccine? That doesn't work on anyone over 40
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Clogs
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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message #2527204 wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 9:40 pm

Unfortunately, with everyone on lockdown, it's not the most connected that will be the greatest spreaders, it will be a subset that ignore lockdown. Also you can't tie them down and force them to be vaccinated.
It's still unknown whether the vaccine prevents transmission, so vaccinating the group with the greatest percentage of people dying or being hospitalised has to be the main strategy.
One would have to think the vaccine has some impact on transmission. Every other vaccine we have ever rolled out has had some impact on transmission (many have been very succesful). Hopefully this is no different.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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Clogs wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 11:37 pm
message #2527204 wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 9:40 pm

Unfortunately, with everyone on lockdown, it's not the most connected that will be the greatest spreaders, it will be a subset that ignore lockdown. Also you can't tie them down and force them to be vaccinated.
It's still unknown whether the vaccine prevents transmission, so vaccinating the group with the greatest percentage of people dying or being hospitalised has to be the main strategy.
One would have to think the vaccine has some impact on transmission. Every other vaccine we have ever rolled out has had some impact on transmission (many have been very succesful). Hopefully this is no different.
Indeed. But is it preferable to vaccinate the care workers and have them maybe/possibly not pass on the virus, or vaccinate the patients and stop them from dying?
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CM11
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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message #2527204 wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 11:35 pm
Gospel wrote: Wed Jan 06, 2021 6:39 pm
Openside wrote:I guess its up to various countries how they do it, maybe they reason the elderly don't mix much etc. God knows no one seems to know the right way to deal with this thing. Its all guesswork to a greater or lesser degree :|
Surely you vaccinate according to the mortality rate? Isn't that medical doctrine? Under 40s are a very low risk group. Due to the EU vaccine procurement disaster there's a very real danger they're going to run out of doses.
Maybe they've got a supply of that sanofi vaccine? That doesn't work on anyone over 40
Has it been proven under 40? Not sure if you're just being glib or if you're being serious but if it's effective to avoid transmission under 40s then use that too, no?
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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from one of our posters on Stalkbook
Brisbane is in lockdown. The UK is too.
The US is reeling out of control.
New Zealand is at the beach.
:smug: :smug: :smug: (touch wood)
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Clogs
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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message #2527204 wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 11:42 pm
Clogs wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 11:37 pm
message #2527204 wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 9:40 pm

Unfortunately, with everyone on lockdown, it's not the most connected that will be the greatest spreaders, it will be a subset that ignore lockdown. Also you can't tie them down and force them to be vaccinated.
It's still unknown whether the vaccine prevents transmission, so vaccinating the group with the greatest percentage of people dying or being hospitalised has to be the main strategy.
One would have to think the vaccine has some impact on transmission. Every other vaccine we have ever rolled out has had some impact on transmission (many have been very succesful). Hopefully this is no different.
Indeed. But is it preferable to vaccinate the care workers and have them maybe/possibly not pass on the virus, or vaccinate the patients and stop them from dying?
Well dying prevention would be priority one by a long way. But if we got a high % of reduction in transmissibility as an additional benefit that would be a great outcome. The best way to reduce risk is to eliminate that risk. People won't die of it if they don't contract it.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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[South African company] Aspen Pharmacare could start production of the Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccines in SA by late March, early April

All vaccines produced will be exported to J&J.

Aspen has current capacity to manufacture up to 300 million doses of the vaccine.

Aspen Pharmacare could start production of Johnson & Johnson (J&J) Covid-19 vaccines in South Africa by late March or early April if all approvals are in place, a senior company executive said

All the vaccines produced will be exported to J&J and will be a part of its global supply inventory, Stavros Nicolaou, Group Senior Executive, Strategic Trade at Aspen said.

"We are going to receive a tech transfer to contract manufacture for them (J&J)... Aspen has current capacity to manufacture up to 300 million doses of [the] Covid-19 vaccine," Nicolaou said in an interview with Reuters on Thursday, adding that these would be exported to J&J.

South Africa's government is in talks with J&J in an effort to secure some of this product for its own consumption. J&J is in the final phase of its clinical trials and is likely to announce results by the end of January, Nicolaou added.
https://www.news24.com/news24/southafri ... h-20210107
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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Indonesia have an interesting take on vaccinations. Priority one will be the 18 to 49 year olds - the spreaders
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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Enzedder wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 8:18 am Indonesia have an interesting take on vaccinations. Priority one will be the 18 to 49 year olds - the spreaders
At this point, who knows what the optimal strategy is? Depending on which vaccine is predominant in Indo, vaccinating the most socially active folk might be the right move.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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Listening to UK government minister Grant Shapps on the BBC this morning, I thought that he strongly implied that the science has shown that vaccines do not work on the South African variant?
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Varsity Way wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 9:47 am Listening to UK government minister Grant Shapps on the BBC this morning, I thought that he strongly implied that the science has shown that vaccines do not work on the South African variant?
Please don't fvck around. The Australian Government had a bit of press recently about how they are investing in ensuring vaccines can handle new variants and mutations, and I thought it a bit odd at the time. 2+2 is starting to equal something.

Fark.
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bimboman
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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Clogs wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:06 am Fvcking fvckity fvck! :x :x

https://www.vox.com/22213033/covid-19-m ... uth-africa

A scientist on BBC this morning specifically stated test show it works on both variants.
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Clogs
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bimboman wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:16 am
Clogs wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:06 am Fvcking fvckity fvck! :x :x

https://www.vox.com/22213033/covid-19-m ... uth-africa

A scientist on BBC this morning specifically stated test show it works on both variants.
Thank fvck. Did they state how well it works? Is it at the same 95% level as the other variants?
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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Enzedder wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 8:18 am Indonesia have an interesting take on vaccinations. Priority one will be the 18 to 49 year olds - the spreaders
They won’t give it to under 18’s presumably - which is a major flaw in this strategy. The idea that children don’t spread it has been floated but not widely accepted.
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Clogs
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Enzedder wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 8:18 am Indonesia have an interesting take on vaccinations. Priority one will be the 18 to 49 year olds - the spreaders
They are a bit more 3rd world. The plan would be to protect your most productive so they can provide for the elders who can no longer contribute. I doubt they have much social security/welfare. So if the 40 year old bread winner dies, so too do the grandparents.
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Cartman
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US deaths are insane
Not far from reaching the population of Cape Town for example
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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Edit: Apols, this is already on the Brexit thread.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-tees-55579004

https://twitter.com/BBCNEandCumbria?ref ... r%5Eauthor
Patients have turned down the chance to have the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine because they want to "wait for the English one", a doctor says
A doctor has urged people to get one of the two coronavirus vaccines as soon as they possibly can.

Dr Simon Stockley, from Eaglescliffe Medical Practice in Stockton, said he did not think there was a difference between the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine and the Oxford-AstraZeneca version.

"The best vaccine as far as I can work out is the one that can be put into your arm soonest," he said.

Another doctor claimed some patients had turned down the Pfizer vaccine.

The US/German Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was made available at the start of December, while the Oxford-AstraZeneca version was authorised on 30 December.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation said both vaccines were safe.

"I can well understand that people are trying to make a decision as to whether one is better than another and I don't think there's any evidence that allows you to make that distinction," Dr Stockley told BBC Radio Tees.

"If you are being offered the Pfizer vaccine now, waiting for something else to come along that is describably better seems perverse."

Dr Stockley was responding to a tweet from Dr Paul Williams, former Labour MP for Stockton South, which said: "Some local patients have turned down an offer this weekend of getting a Covid vaccine when they found out it was the Pfizer one. 'I'll wait for the English one'."

Dr Williams was a GP and continued to see patients while he was an MP. After being voted out in 2019 he has worked at North Tees Hospital.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock has previously said the Pfizer vaccine was "a tribute to scientific endeavour and human ingenuity and to the hard work of so many people".

Boris Johnson has said getting the jab was "good for you and good for the whole country".

On Thursday, the prime minister confirmed almost 1.5 million people in the UK have now received at least one dose of a Covid vaccine.

He said the vaccine rollout was a national challenge requiring an unprecedented effort and said it would involve the armed forces.

More than 1,000 GP-led sites in England will be able to offer a total of "hundreds of thousands" of jabs each day by 15 January, he said.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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C69 wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 10:31 am
RodneyRegis wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 10:27 am
bobbity wrote: Wed Jan 06, 2021 11:41 am Back row - you'll have plenty of time to think about it, likely not to get it this year.

You should though, contribute to general immunity and protect people who can't have the vaccine or for whom it doesn't work so well.
How would it protect them if he can still catch and transmit?
The viral load will be less and he will be less lilely to catch and shed the infection. And if he gets the infection he is less likely to be severely ill.
Err probably
Less likely to be ill and therefore running around town spreading his filthy germs.
Probably.
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backrow wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 11:33 am
C69 wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 10:31 am
RodneyRegis wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 10:27 am
bobbity wrote: Wed Jan 06, 2021 11:41 am Back row - you'll have plenty of time to think about it, likely not to get it this year.

You should though, contribute to general immunity and protect people who can't have the vaccine or for whom it doesn't work so well.
How would it protect them if he can still catch and transmit?
The viral load will be less and he will be less lilely to catch and shed the infection. And if he gets the infection he is less likely to be severely ill.
Err probably
Hope I won’t get it, natural immmunity to bugs , plus I’m lazy and like wfh and don’t mind staying away from people. My biggest worry is if our nanny brings the bug in as she’s a TA at the school, and nobody knows for sure how tranmissable it is in a chain with people showing no symptoms. Even if I do get it, I’m unlikely to be able to pass it on to anyone.

Certainly, some of the kids who had covid at school, were sent to school coughing - some parents need a stern look at themselves.
Rules m8
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Gospel wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 1:41 pm
backrow wrote:Certainly, some of the kids who had covid at school, were sent to school coughing - some parents need a stern look at themselves.
This is where the rubber meets the road for me. The UK Government, the Civil Service, PHE and National Health Service managers have been found wanting in the face of this pandemic - but so have large sections of the British public who don't seem to care how their selfish actions effect the vulnerable. Huge swathes of the population have refused to be inconvenienced. The infection rate would not be where it is if more people were judicious with who they meet. Had we acted as if we were all carriers of the virus this thing wouldn't have run like an uncontrollable wild fire through our society.
The problem is, in not being specific enough with office staff WFH they've f**ked it.

You can't say "we're going to fine people on the spot for not wearing a mask in the street" whilst simultaneously saying any construction business can stay open and allow them to make admin staff come in who could easily WFH.

People will send kids to school if they can. I WFH and my kids go to school because I'm (laughably) considered a key worker. My wife is in admin at a construction firm and could WFH but her bosses are keeping everyone in the office. If we were both at home we'd probably keep the kids here, but I'm f**ked if I'm doing January tax returns with my 5 year old constantly needing help with her online lessons and spilling shit all over my work laptop.
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Scum will be scum, even in a pandemic:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-55577426
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hermie wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 2:28 pm
Gospel wrote: Wed Jan 06, 2021 8:26 pm
message wrote:Maybe they've run out of old people to vaccinate?
I know they've had it bad but not that bad !
Most are going with the protect the vulnerable first approach. But if your main priority is halting the spread of the virus old people are the last people you should start with. Targeting the super-spreaders isn't a terrible idea; if a little morally complicated. But if the virus is contained quicker with this approach it obviously has a knock on affect of offering some protection to the more vulnerable as well.
We don't know if it stops the spread.
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https://www.reuters.com/article/health- ... SL1N2JI2LZ

Pfizer supposedly works on new variants
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Duff Paddy wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:21 am
Enzedder wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 8:18 am Indonesia have an interesting take on vaccinations. Priority one will be the 18 to 49 year olds - the spreaders
They won’t give it to under 18’s presumably - which is a major flaw in this strategy. The idea that children don’t spread it has been floated but not widely accepted.

The vaccines we have available in Europe are not licensed to be given to children.
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RodneyRegis wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:45 pm
hermie wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 2:28 pm
Gospel wrote: Wed Jan 06, 2021 8:26 pm
message wrote:Maybe they've run out of old people to vaccinate?
I know they've had it bad but not that bad !
Most are going with the protect the vulnerable first approach. But if your main priority is halting the spread of the virus old people are the last people you should start with. Targeting the super-spreaders isn't a terrible idea; if a little morally complicated. But if the virus is contained quicker with this approach it obviously has a knock on affect of offering some protection to the more vulnerable as well.
We don't know if it stops the spread.

Because everything we know about viruses has to be forgotten this time round.
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hermie
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RodneyRegis wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:45 pm
hermie wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 2:28 pm
Gospel wrote: Wed Jan 06, 2021 8:26 pm
message wrote:Maybe they've run out of old people to vaccinate?
I know they've had it bad but not that bad !
Most are going with the protect the vulnerable first approach. But if your main priority is halting the spread of the virus old people are the last people you should start with. Targeting the super-spreaders isn't a terrible idea; if a little morally complicated. But if the virus is contained quicker with this approach it obviously has a knock on affect of offering some protection to the more vulnerable as well.
We don't know if it stops the spread.
We don't know if it stops the spread completely. But obviously if the vaccines stop people getting sick it will go a long way to curbing how transmissible the virus is.
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Post by backrow »

RodneyRegis wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:38 pm
backrow wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 11:33 am
C69 wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 10:31 am
RodneyRegis wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 10:27 am
bobbity wrote: Wed Jan 06, 2021 11:41 am Back row - you'll have plenty of time to think about it, likely not to get it this year.

You should though, contribute to general immunity and protect people who can't have the vaccine or for whom it doesn't work so well.
How would it protect them if he can still catch and transmit?
The viral load will be less and he will be less lilely to catch and shed the infection. And if he gets the infection he is less likely to be severely ill.
Err probably
Hope I won’t get it, natural immmunity to bugs , plus I’m lazy and like wfh and don’t mind staying away from people. My biggest worry is if our nanny brings the bug in as she’s a TA at the school, and nobody knows for sure how tranmissable it is in a chain with people showing no symptoms. Even if I do get it, I’m unlikely to be able to pass it on to anyone.

Certainly, some of the kids who had covid at school, were sent to school coughing - some parents need a stern look at themselves.
Rules m8
I’m doing you a favour - she’s 50 and looks like Dawn French

Best one was 2 years ago Spanish au pair, looked like Penolpe Cruz, all svelte and accent. No tits but when built like a whippet and fit, that’s not a dealbreaker.
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hermie
Posts: 10498
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by hermie »

RodneyRegis wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:52 pm https://www.reuters.com/article/health- ... SL1N2JI2LZ

Pfizer supposedly works on new variants
Good news but sounds like they haven't tested against the E484K mutation (SA) which according to the Vox article is the most concerning.
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Duff Paddy
Posts: 39619
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Duff Paddy »

bimboman wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:56 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:21 am
Enzedder wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 8:18 am Indonesia have an interesting take on vaccinations. Priority one will be the 18 to 49 year olds - the spreaders
They won’t give it to under 18’s presumably - which is a major flaw in this strategy. The idea that children don’t spread it has been floated but not widely accepted.

The vaccines we have available in Europe are not licensed to be given to children.
It’s not licenced to give a delayed second dose either
bimboman
Posts: 70038
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by bimboman »

Duff Paddy wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 2:08 pm
bimboman wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:56 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:21 am
Enzedder wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 8:18 am Indonesia have an interesting take on vaccinations. Priority one will be the 18 to 49 year olds - the spreaders
They won’t give it to under 18’s presumably - which is a major flaw in this strategy. The idea that children don’t spread it has been floated but not widely accepted.

The vaccines we have available in Europe are not licensed to be given to children.
It’s not licenced to give a delayed second dose either


It is the UK we changed the licence conditions. We didn’t change the age allowances.
bimboman
Posts: 70038
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by bimboman »

hermie wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 2:05 pm
RodneyRegis wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:52 pm https://www.reuters.com/article/health- ... SL1N2JI2LZ

Pfizer supposedly works on new variants
Good news but sounds like they haven't tested against the E484K mutation (SA) which according to the Vox article is the most concerning.
“The Vox “. :lol:
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Duff Paddy
Posts: 39619
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Duff Paddy »

bimboman wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 2:10 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 2:08 pm
bimboman wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:56 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:21 am
Enzedder wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 8:18 am Indonesia have an interesting take on vaccinations. Priority one will be the 18 to 49 year olds - the spreaders
They won’t give it to under 18’s presumably - which is a major flaw in this strategy. The idea that children don’t spread it has been floated but not widely accepted.

The vaccines we have available in Europe are not licensed to be given to children.
It’s not licenced to give a delayed second dose either


It is the UK we changed the licence conditions. We didn’t change the age allowances.
You changed the licence based on no clinical study data? Interesting
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Gospel
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Gospel »

RodneyRegis wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:43 pm
Gospel wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 1:41 pm
backrow wrote:Certainly, some of the kids who had covid at school, were sent to school coughing - some parents need a stern look at themselves.
This is where the rubber meets the road for me. The UK Government, the Civil Service, PHE and National Health Service managers have been found wanting in the face of this pandemic - but so have large sections of the British public who don't seem to care how their selfish actions effect the vulnerable. Huge swathes of the population have refused to be inconvenienced. The infection rate would not be where it is if more people were judicious with who they meet. Had we acted as if we were all carriers of the virus this thing wouldn't have run like an uncontrollable wild fire through our society.
The problem is, in not being specific enough with office staff WFH they've f**ked it.

You can't say "we're going to fine people on the spot for not wearing a mask in the street" whilst simultaneously saying any construction business can stay open and allow them to make admin staff come in who could easily WFH.

People will send kids to school if they can. I WFH and my kids go to school because I'm (laughably) considered a key worker. My wife is in admin at a construction firm and could WFH but her bosses are keeping everyone in the office. If we were both at home we'd probably keep the kids here, but I'm f**ked if I'm doing January tax returns with my 5 year old constantly needing help with her online lessons and spilling shit all over my work laptop.
I don't know how much of the infection is spread in the office - I imagine it's hugely varied. My misses works for Sanofi and they have very good virus protocols as you'd expect. Clearly public transport is a serious risk. But I suspect these mass infections are mostly happening in homes where people are congregating regardless. We have over 2% of the public infected at this point and an appalling number of deaths. That has to be due in part to a laissez-faire attitude to the pandemic and a wilful ignorance of the rules of transmission. As a singular example I see my neighbours 28 year old 'kids' rocking in and out despite the fact they socially mix with lots of others. The daughter lectures her 67 year old morbidly obese father about not going to the store - wilfully ignorant of the more serious threat. I have mentioned this a number of times only for him to shrug and say "Yeah but you have to see your kids".
bimboman
Posts: 70038
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by bimboman »

Duff Paddy wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 2:11 pm
bimboman wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 2:10 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 2:08 pm
bimboman wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:56 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:21 am

They won’t give it to under 18’s presumably - which is a major flaw in this strategy. The idea that children don’t spread it has been floated but not widely accepted.

The vaccines we have available in Europe are not licensed to be given to children.
It’s not licenced to give a delayed second dose either


It is the UK we changed the licence conditions. We didn’t change the age allowances.
You changed the licence based on no clinical study data? Interesting

Actually there was heaps of study and science published by our regulator when it made the sensible change.

You guys been delivered your first 5,000 vaccine batch yet ?
bimboman
Posts: 70038
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by bimboman »

You can't say "we're going to fine people on the spot for not wearing a mask in the street" whilst simultaneously saying any construction business can stay open and allow them to make admin staff come in who could easily WFH.

Well you can’t say that at all, regulations on mask wearing don’t cover the “street”.
backrow
Posts: 23171
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by backrow »

RodneyRegis wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:43 pm
Gospel wrote: Thu Jan 07, 2021 1:41 pm
backrow wrote:Certainly, some of the kids who had covid at school, were sent to school coughing - some parents need a stern look at themselves.
This is where the rubber meets the road for me. The UK Government, the Civil Service, PHE and National Health Service managers have been found wanting in the face of this pandemic - but so have large sections of the British public who don't seem to care how their selfish actions effect the vulnerable. Huge swathes of the population have refused to be inconvenienced. The infection rate would not be where it is if more people were judicious with who they meet. Had we acted as if we were all carriers of the virus this thing wouldn't have run like an uncontrollable wild fire through our society.
The problem is, in not being specific enough with office staff WFH they've f**ked it.

You can't say "we're going to fine people on the spot for not wearing a mask in the street" whilst simultaneously saying any construction business can stay open and allow them to make admin staff come in who could easily WFH.

People will send kids to school if they can. I WFH and my kids go to school because I'm (laughably) considered a key worker. My wife is in admin at a construction firm and could WFH but her bosses are keeping everyone in the office. If we were both at home we'd probably keep the kids here, but I'm f**ked if I'm doing January tax returns with my 5 year old constantly needing help with her online lessons and spilling shit all over my work laptop.
The builders just want to stare at your wife’s tits and not make their own tea, that’s why she ‘has’ to be in
Nolanator
Posts: 39412
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Location: Dublin

Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Nolanator »

Enzedder wrote: Fri Jan 08, 2021 12:55 am from one of our posters on Stalkbook
Brisbane is in lockdown. The UK is too.
The US is reeling out of control.
New Zealand is at the beach.
:smug: :smug: :smug: (touch wood)
Watch out for sharks.
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