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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 11:49 am 
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Of those who have kids who could go back to primary school what are you going to do?

I had an email from our local primary yesterday with 4 pages on information of what it will be like. The very clear message (reading between the lines)was that it will be pointless sending our youngest back.

If I can cut and paste I will. Bit of a luddite sadly.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 11:55 am 
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In NI school is out until September.
My eldest is going into P1 and we’ve already been told shit like she’s only going to be in half a day, no toys in the classroom, no storytime, no playing in the playground etc.
Certainly puts a massive downer on what should be a happy period of her life. Just hope the scars of social distancing don’t turn a generation of young kids into socially impaired introverts.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:02 pm 
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I want my son to go back (he is in nursery) but my ex doesn't


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:02 pm 
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My daughter is in High School. I have no issue whatsoever of her starting back when ever they open the doors.
My wife however disagrees, C'est la vie.
Loads of hysterical shit being posted on facebook etc by ill informed moronic parents.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:10 pm 
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I'd seriously consider returning my boy. Socialising will do him good, and I think the general environment will be better for him. I don't think we're doing a terrible job homeschooling, but it's generating a lot of pressure and stress that I think can be avoided.

Guess we'll just have to wait and see.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:16 pm 
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My year 6 goes back, my year 4 stays at home.

The school as I’ve said has pretty useless over the last couple of months (senco aside). So have no expectations, other than the proper socialising for finishing school in year 6.

All the statistics and science point to it being very low risk.


Last edited by bimboman on Sat May 16, 2020 12:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:16 pm 
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I’ve seen the Facebook post of the kids standing in the playground squares.

What are they doing currently with keyworkers children who are still at school?
What are Sweden doing?


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:26 pm 
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Jim Lahey wrote:
In NI school is out until September.
My eldest is going into P1 and we’ve already been told shit like she’s only going to be in half a day, no toys in the classroom, no storytime, no playing in the playground etc.
Certainly puts a massive downer on what should be a happy period of her life. Just hope the scars of social distancing don’t turn a generation of young kids into socially impaired introverts.



What’s the logic in no playground? Surely better to be outside whenever possible than cooped up in a small room?


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:34 pm 
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The schooL letter


Dear parents
I am sure you will be well aware by now that the government has asked schools to open on the 1st of June to pupils in Reception, Year 1 and Year 6, in addition to children of Critical Workers.
Over the last 8 weeks, ………………. (schoolname) has remained open to the children of Critical Workers. During this time, it has given us an insight into the measures we have needed to put in place, for just a very small number of pupils, to minimise the risk of infection. This, of course, has also been heavily reliant on the excellent way in which the pupils have followed the very strict rules on social distancing and personal hygiene.
Although the government has stated that schools will only be able to open to additional pupils if the ‘R is below 1’ we feel it is important for us to put plans in place and be ready regardless of, what and when the government will final decide (which could be as late as the 28th May). Ultimately, the school wants to provide the safest possible learning environment for all pupils and staff and, based on how schools differ across the country, approaches will also differ as, we all know, one size does not fit all!
To enable us to know what the school can possibly offer in terms of providing adequate human resources and physical space for the numbers that may want to attend, it must have an indication of whether you will decide to send your child in to school on the 1st June or continue with home schooling. The government and the Local Authority are aware that parents may choose to still keep their children at home and have made it very clear that no child will be penalised for not attending school.
We would like nothing more than to have the children back with us, and we will do all we can to make the school as safe for pupils and staff as possible, but we cannot provide you with the guarantee of ruling out any risk of someone contracting COVID19. We also know that we cannot provide the same learning environment that our pupils are used to. Based on the guidance we have been given by the DfE and the Local Authority, we feel it is important that, if you are planning on sending your child to school, you have a clear idea of what to expect so that you can help to prepare your child before they arrive.
The information below outlines what we feel is necessary to reduce the risks as much as possible for pupils, staff and extended families. The content of this letter has been discussed with the governing body who are in full support of the need to inform parents, in detail, of how our school will manage the health and safety of our community during this very difficult time.
WHAT TO EXPECT FOR YOUR CHILD IN SCHOOL IN THE CURRENT CLIMATE:
Will my child be in their own classroom?
Depending on numbers, the children will be put into small groups of approximately 8 pupils (depending on the size of the space available) and allocated a classroom on their first day. For larger numbers, the school hall will also be used to help to provide the social distancing between tables. They will use only their dedicated classroom or hall with the same group of children on the days that they come in to school. There will be limited access to the remainder of the school where any essential movement in corridors will be closely monitored to ensure social distancing measures are kept

Will my child be taught by their own teacher?
Several staff are shielding for their own health reasons or for the health of members of a family member they live with. As such, our staffing will be limited. It is therefore very unlikely that your child will be taught by their own teacher. Although, where possible, we will have the classes covered by familiar staff rather than supply teachers.
How will social distancing be managed in the classroom?
Each child will be allocated their own desk. Desks will be clearly named and positioned at least 2 metres apart. When your child enters the classroom, they will be directed to their table where they will keep their bag and coat for the remainder of the day. This will reduce movement around the classroom when getting items out of bags and avoid the close contact that often happens when coats are hung together in the cloakroom area. Each child will be given their own pot of pencils in a named pot. This will not be given to any other child. However, we strongly recommend that, where possible, pupils bring their own pencil case in each day. At all times in the classroom, pupils will be expected to maintain the 2 metre social distancing rule. Limited movement around the classroom will be in place to reduce the risk of coming within 2 metres of another child. Where activity boxes are on offer to the younger pupils, these will be separated out into individual sets if possible, but this cannot be guaranteed as this is pupil number dependent. Where possible, at the end of each day, staff will use Milton to wash any used equipment. Children will be asked to wash their hands after handling equipment in class if it is likely that this has been used by another child.
How will social distancing be managed during break time and lunch time?
Playtimes – when pupils are in the playground they will be reminded to keep apart at all times and, whenever possible, we will provide a dedicated play space per child. As such, playtimes will be staggered, which will ensure that playground areas are only used by very small groups of up to 8 pupils. Any equipment that is made available to the children at playtimes will be monitored carefully e.g. skipping ropes will be named and only used by that child on that day. Access to the playgrounds at lunchtime will also be staggered.
Will school lunches be available?
School lunches will be available as usual and will need to be ordered in advance. The children will need to eat their lunch at their dedicated tables to maintain the social distancing. Children will need to bring their own water bottles in each day. These must be clearly named. We are not yet able to confirm whether the KS1 fruit and veg will be available for snacks. So please do provide a snack for your child if they are used to having one during the day.
What lessons will my child be taught in school?
Learning in school will be the same as the online activities that the children working at home will continue to access. This is to ensure that all pupils in each year group receive the same learning resources. The children in school will not be provided with laptops to complete their tasks, instead they will be provided with printed versions of the worksheets available online. Your child will be expected to bring in their writing and maths books each day so that they can continue to stick in any completed worksheets. Staff will not be able to handle the children’s workbooks to mark or work 1-1 in close proximity with your child due to the strict social distancing rules to keep pupils and staff as safe as possible. Where possible, work will be marked collectively as a whole group. Any items produce by the children will be sent home at the end of each day.
Will my child need to wear school uniform?
Any child attending school will be expected to be in school uniform, including Fab Friday uniform at the end of the week. However, we are also aware, that over a period of 8 weeks, pupils may have grown out of their uniform or school shoes. Therefore, some pupils may not be able to wear their usual uniform items. If you wish, new uniform can be ordered if required, but this is not essential at this stage. PE kits will remain in your child’s bag until needed on the day they have PE. PE kits will not remain in school.
What level of hand washing will my child be expected to maintain?
All children will be regularly reminded to wash their hands for 20 seconds. All children will be expected to wash their hands as soon as they arrive at school, after they go to the toilet, when they have come back in from playtime, before and after lunch/snack time and at any point where they may have coughed or sneezed into their hands. Soap is
available in school but if your child suffers with sensitive skin, then they may bring in their own medicated soap. This must be in a named container and stored in their bag when not in use. The school has also installed hand sanitiser dispensers throughout the school for regular use by pupils and staff throughout the day.
Will my child be able to wear a face mask and will staff be wearing face masks?
Schools do not have access to extensive PPE. The current government recommendation that staff should not wear face masks in schools. However, if a child requires intimate care or first aid, staff have been told to wear a face mask, gloves and, if necessary, a plastic apron to reduce the risk to the child and also the member of staff. Where possible, children will be asked to face away from the adult to help counteract the inability to socially distance themselves in this situation. Parents can choose to send their child into school with a face mask if they so wish and there are now school uniform companies that are designing face masks to help with the difficulty of social distancing in schools. These are currently available through our uniform suppliers and samples are available on request if you so wish. This is not an additional measure that we would expect. But parents wanting their child to wear a face mask, we ask that you consider if your child feels comfortable wearing one and that this does not cause them any further distress.
What if my child becomes distressed in school?
Due to the unfamiliar set up in school and the inability for staff to offer their usual level of physical care and comfort, it is possible that some children may become distressed. Please be assured that we will contact you immediately if this is the case as we would not wish your children to continue their day feeling upset and not being able to receive the care and attention that we would normally be more than willing to provide.
What do I do if my child, or anyone living in the same household, shows any symptoms of COVID19?
For the safety of others, it is vital that your child remains at home and the whole family must follow the strict guidelines of self-isolation for 14 days. It is also very important that you inform the school as soon as possible as we will need to inform the parents of other children attending to be extra vigilant with checking their child and family members of any symptoms. We ask that in all cases, you continue to regularly check for symptoms, such as a high temperature, ideally, on a daily basis. Staff will be directed to do the same. Any confirmed cases will result in the school being closed for a period of time to undergo a deep clean. I am unable to confirm at this stage how long that may take.
Where should I bring my child at the start of the day?
If you are planning on sending your child to school, you will be expected to register your child’s place the week before. This is to enable the school to plan for the level of staffing that will be required to cover the number of pupils attending. Before your child arrives on the 1st June, you will be informed of which classroom door you will need to bring your child to. This will be your child’s dedicated classroom whilst they are attending school or until the remaining year groups are able to attend. On arrival, it is very likely that there will be other parents and pupils arriving at the same time. We ask that you follow the same rules for social distancing at all times and ensure your child stays by your side until you reach the classroom door. Please note, to limit further movement within confined spaces and limit the number of people coming in to the classroom, you will not be able to enter the building with your child. After a long period of time at home with you and the school set up not being what our pupils are used to, some young children may find this handing over distressing. Please be aware that we will not be able to physically help bring your child into the classroom, but we will do what we can to encourage and distract to help them make that transition.
Is there likely to be any last minute changes that could affect my child being able to attend school?
The government have stated that it may be as late as the 28th May before they can confirm whether schools will be open to Reception, Year 1 and Year 6 pupils on the 1st June. If this is the case, we will inform you via email as soon as we know.
If there is a risk that, due to staff having to self-isolate and, as a result, the ratio of staff to pupil is not at a level that can be safely managed, the school will have to make the decision to stagger the number of pupils that can attend each day. The school will review the pupil to staff ratio on a daily basis. If school is not able to open based on pupil to staff ratio, your child may be able to access another educational setting for a temporary period of time if needed. This will need to be confirmed at the time as school places may also be limited elsewhere.

If the number of pupils requiring places in school increases to a stage that makes it impossible for social distancing to be

safely applied or too few staff are available to meet the pupil to staff ratio, schools have been told they must, at first, prioritise the pupils of Critical Worker parents, then Reception children, then Year 1 and finally, Year 6. This is based on current government guidance.
In many cases, particularly with younger children, the social distancing rule can be hard to remember and staff will do their best to keep reminding the children as often as needed. However, if a pupil is found to be deliberately not following the social distancing rules and is seen to be putting themselves and others at risk, we will have no choice but to contact the child’s parent and ask them to collect their child from school. A further discussion will then be held as to whether it is safe for the child to return to school.
Do I have to send my child to school?
It is your decision whether you send your child to school or not. The DfE and the Local Authority have confirmed that a pupil’s attendance will not be affected if they do not attend school during this time. If you do decide to keep your child at home, the online learning activities will still be made available for all year groups and home learning can continue as it has done for the past 7 weeks. Staff will continue to be available to parents and pupils during this time and,
Having read the information above, we would ask that you now use the link below to complete a very short survey as soon as possible to enable us to plan for the 1st June. This survey is for parents who are classed as Critical Workers and parents of Reception, Year 1 and Year 6 pupils. Please ensure you complete a separate survey for each child. The results of this survey will provide us with the information we need to create a risk assessment which, in turn, could result in the governors and school leaders deciding on a different approach to ensure they have done everything possible to minimise the risks to pupils and staff in school. Any decisions made by the school leaders and governors will always prioritise the safety and wellbeing of pupils, staff and their families.




Please do get in touch if you have any further questions and we will try to provide you with the answers, if we can! We will continue to keep you updated as and when any changes to arrangements are forced upon us. But most importantly, we will continue to care for you and your children whether it is within our school walls or across a wireless link and together we will wait in hope of some positive changes over the weeks to come. I have no doubt that our community will become even closer when we are all finally come back together again. Until then, please take care and stay safe and well.
We will be here when you are ready for us.
Kind regards


Last edited by Varsity Way on Sat May 16, 2020 12:37 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:35 pm 
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Jim Lahey wrote:
In NI school is out until September.
My eldest is going into P1 and we’ve already been told shit like she’s only going to be in half a day, no toys in the classroom, no storytime, no playing in the playground etc.
Certainly puts a massive downer on what should be a happy period of her life. Just hope the scars of social distancing don’t turn a generation of young kids into socially impaired introverts.


:lol:

That's some impressive catastrophising hyperbole considering we're only a couple of months in. If they'd been kept apart for years you might have a genuine concern.

Also introversion is about generating energy from time alone and being tired out by interaction, a preference for solitude. It's not being awkward or shy or incapable of socially interacting. Generally considered an innate trait rather than something developed.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:37 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
My year 6 goes back, my year 4 stays at home.

The school as I’ve said has pretty useless over the last couple of months (senco aside). So have no expectations, other than the proper socialising for finishing school in year 6.

All the statistics and science point to it being very low risk.

For whom? The children, parents or the teachers or all three?


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:38 pm 
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SaintK wrote:
bimboman wrote:
My year 6 goes back, my year 4 stays at home.

The school as I’ve said has pretty useless over the last couple of months (senco aside). So have no expectations, other than the proper socialising for finishing school in year 6.

All the statistics and science point to it being very low risk.

For whom? The children, parents or the teachers or all three?



All three. The hardest bit will be drop off and pick up .... though that’s outdoors this time of the year.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:42 pm 
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Varsity Way wrote:
The schooL letter

Which education aauthority is the school in if you don't mins telling us?


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:45 pm 
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SaintK wrote:
Varsity Way wrote:
The schooL letter

Which education aauthority is the school in if you don't mins telling us?


Cornwall and Isles of Scilly


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:46 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
SaintK wrote:
bimboman wrote:
My year 6 goes back, my year 4 stays at home.

The school as I’ve said has pretty useless over the last couple of months (senco aside). So have no expectations, other than the proper socialising for finishing school in year 6.

All the statistics and science point to it being very low risk.

For whom? The children, parents or the teachers or all three?



All three. The hardest bit will be drop off and pick up .... though that’s outdoors this time of the year.

I think it's going to be incredibly difficult to keep the very young pupils in junior/infants distanced, it will be like herding cats!!


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:49 pm 
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SaintK wrote:
bimboman wrote:
SaintK wrote:
bimboman wrote:
My year 6 goes back, my year 4 stays at home.

The school as I’ve said has pretty useless over the last couple of months (senco aside). So have no expectations, other than the proper socialising for finishing school in year 6.

All the statistics and science point to it being very low risk.

For whom? The children, parents or the teachers or all three?



All three. The hardest bit will be drop off and pick up .... though that’s outdoors this time of the year.

I think it's going to be incredibly difficult to keep the very young pupils in junior/infants distanced, it will be like herding cats!!


This is what i don't get, i thought kids don't catch it? do they need to be distanced?


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:55 pm 
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Varsity Way wrote:
SaintK wrote:
Varsity Way wrote:
The schooL letter

Which education aauthority is the school in if you don't mins telling us?


Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

Thanks.
I'm going to share that letter with my daughter in law if you don't mind. She's deputy head of a smallish village junior/infants school in Hertfordshire and going through this same problem. She's up for going back particularly for the kids that are transitioning to senior school but she's not sure she wants to send my 5 year old grandaughter back to her school which comes under another county education authority.
My son is not sure either of them should be going back
Dilemmas all round


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:56 pm 
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Jim Lahey wrote:
In NI school is out until September.
My eldest is going into P1 and we’ve already been told shit like she’s only going to be in half a day, no toys in the classroom, no storytime, no playing in the playground etc.
Certainly puts a massive downer on what should be a happy period of her life. Just hope the scars of social distancing don’t turn a generation of young kids into socially impaired introverts.

Agreed Jim. School’s in England stay open a month after us so there’s no question that we’ll stay open until September. As you say, social issues would be my worry


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:57 pm 
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SaintK wrote:
Varsity Way wrote:
SaintK wrote:
Varsity Way wrote:
The schooL letter

Which education aauthority is the school in if you don't mins telling us?


Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

Thanks.
I'm going to share that letter with my daughter in law if you don't mind. She's deputy head of a smallish village junior/infants school in Hertfordshire and going through this same problem. She's up for going back particularly for the kids that are transitioning to senior school but she's not sure she wants to send my 5 year old grandaughter back to her school which comes under another county education authority.
My son is not sure either of them should be going back
Dilemmas all round


By all means share it :thumbup:


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 12:58 pm 
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Varsity Way wrote:
SaintK wrote:
Varsity Way wrote:
SaintK wrote:
Varsity Way wrote:
The schooL letter

Which education aauthority is the school in if you don't mins telling us?


Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

Thanks.
I'm going to share that letter with my daughter in law if you don't mind. She's deputy head of a smallish village junior/infants school in Hertfordshire and going through this same problem. She's up for going back particularly for the kids that are transitioning to senior school but she's not sure she wants to send my 5 year old grandaughter back to her school which comes under another county education authority.
My son is not sure either of them should be going back
Dilemmas all round


By all means share it :thumbup:

Thanks


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 1:03 pm 
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DragsterDriver wrote:
SaintK wrote:
bimboman wrote:
SaintK wrote:
bimboman wrote:
My year 6 goes back, my year 4 stays at home.

The school as I’ve said has pretty useless over the last couple of months (senco aside). So have no expectations, other than the proper socialising for finishing school in year 6.

All the statistics and science point to it being very low risk.

For whom? The children, parents or the teachers or all three?



All three. The hardest bit will be drop off and pick up .... though that’s outdoors this time of the year.

I think it's going to be incredibly difficult to keep the very young pupils in junior/infants distanced, it will be like herding cats!!


This is what i don't get, i thought kids don't catch it? do they need to be distanced?


Everyone can catch it.

There's a question over whether young children, who are asymptomatic, spread it.

The risk to an individual child is small in terms of catching it, it's also then small that anything really bad will happen to them.

It's worth distancing them just to be extra safe.

My concern is that things may not be all that different by September, and if schools haven't adapted by then, home schooling may still need to be the norm.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 1:05 pm 
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Saint....FWIW I think it is an excellent letter from the Head. It's a brilliant school that has been very supportive through the online home schooling period.

Looking at what the landscape will be like we are keeping our 5 year old home. She is on the spectrum and I think the unusual environment would cause her stress. My wife is a housewife who has 12 years former classroom experience as a primary teacher so we are lucky that home schooling is ok for us.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 1:07 pm 
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I genuinely thought children neither suffer nor spread it. If they do schools can’t open, seems binary enough.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 1:08 pm 
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Varsity Way wrote:
Saint....FWIW I think it is an excellent letter from the Head. It's a brilliant school that has been very supportive through the online home schooling period.

Looking at what the landscape will be like we are keeping our 5 year old home. She is on the spectrum and I think the unusual environment would cause her stress. My wife is a housewife who has 12 years former classroom experience as a primary teacher so we are lucky that home schooling is ok for us.

That's great to hear


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 1:56 pm 
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Varsity Way wrote:
Saint....FWIW I think it is an excellent letter from the Head. It's a brilliant school that has been very supportive through the online home schooling period.

Looking at what the landscape will be like we are keeping our 5 year old home. She is on the spectrum and I think the unusual environment would cause her stress. My wife is a housewife who has 12 years former classroom experience as a primary teacher so we are lucky that home schooling is ok for us.


In your circumstances I'd probably stick to homeschooling (or watching my wife do it) too :D.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 1:56 pm 
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sockwithaticket wrote:
Jim Lahey wrote:
In NI school is out until September.
My eldest is going into P1 and we’ve already been told shit like she’s only going to be in half a day, no toys in the classroom, no storytime, no playing in the playground etc.
Certainly puts a massive downer on what should be a happy period of her life. Just hope the scars of social distancing don’t turn a generation of young kids into socially impaired introverts.


:lol:

That's some impressive catastrophising hyperbole considering we're only a couple of months in. If they'd been kept apart for years you might have a genuine concern.

Also introversion is about generating energy from time alone and being tired out by interaction, a preference for solitude. It's not being awkward or shy or incapable of socially interacting. Generally considered an innate trait rather than something developed.

Trauma can impact on a person's social development. An extended exposure to the current atmosphere of anxiety and abnormality will be traumatic for some children.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 2:00 pm 
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juddy wrote:
sockwithaticket wrote:
Jim Lahey wrote:
In NI school is out until September.
My eldest is going into P1 and we’ve already been told shit like she’s only going to be in half a day, no toys in the classroom, no storytime, no playing in the playground etc.
Certainly puts a massive downer on what should be a happy period of her life. Just hope the scars of social distancing don’t turn a generation of young kids into socially impaired introverts.


:lol:

That's some impressive catastrophising hyperbole considering we're only a couple of months in. If they'd been kept apart for years you might have a genuine concern.

Also introversion is about generating energy from time alone and being tired out by interaction, a preference for solitude. It's not being awkward or shy or incapable of socially interacting. Generally considered an innate trait rather than something developed.

Trauma can impact on a person's social development. An extended exposure to the current atmosphere of anxiety and abnormality will be traumatic for some children.



Lots of things can traumatise some children. That’s a far cry from the hysterics of a broken generation of young kids becoming socially retarded.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 2:00 pm 
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Hell yes


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 2:13 pm 
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frillage wrote:
juddy wrote:
sockwithaticket wrote:
Jim Lahey wrote:
In NI school is out until September.
My eldest is going into P1 and we’ve already been told shit like she’s only going to be in half a day, no toys in the classroom, no storytime, no playing in the playground etc.
Certainly puts a massive downer on what should be a happy period of her life. Just hope the scars of social distancing don’t turn a generation of young kids into socially impaired introverts.


:lol:

That's some impressive catastrophising hyperbole considering we're only a couple of months in. If they'd been kept apart for years you might have a genuine concern.

Also introversion is about generating energy from time alone and being tired out by interaction, a preference for solitude. It's not being awkward or shy or incapable of socially interacting. Generally considered an innate trait rather than something developed.

Trauma can impact on a person's social development. An extended exposure to the current atmosphere of anxiety and abnormality will be traumatic for some children.



Lots of things can traumatise some children. That’s a far cry from the hysterics of a broken generation of young kids becoming socially retarded.

Any notion of a generation being damaged is obviously an exaggeration and I don't think anyone is seriously suggesting it, but I think it's potentially a genuine problem for some children that needs to be factored into the attempts to try to return some normality to their lives.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 2:15 pm 
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juddy wrote:
sockwithaticket wrote:
Jim Lahey wrote:
In NI school is out until September.
My eldest is going into P1 and we’ve already been told shit like she’s only going to be in half a day, no toys in the classroom, no storytime, no playing in the playground etc.
Certainly puts a massive downer on what should be a happy period of her life. Just hope the scars of social distancing don’t turn a generation of young kids into socially impaired introverts.


:lol:

That's some impressive catastrophising hyperbole considering we're only a couple of months in. If they'd been kept apart for years you might have a genuine concern.

Also introversion is about generating energy from time alone and being tired out by interaction, a preference for solitude. It's not being awkward or shy or incapable of socially interacting. Generally considered an innate trait rather than something developed.

Trauma can impact on a person's social development. An extended exposure to the current atmosphere of anxiety and abnormality will be traumatic for some children.


Away from the middle class rugby community a lot of kids are stuck home with day-drinking parents and not being homeschooled.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 2:16 pm 
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SaintK wrote:
bimboman wrote:
SaintK wrote:
bimboman wrote:
My year 6 goes back, my year 4 stays at home.

The school as I’ve said has pretty useless over the last couple of months (senco aside). So have no expectations, other than the proper socialising for finishing school in year 6.

All the statistics and science point to it being very low risk.

For whom? The children, parents or the teachers or all three?



All three. The hardest bit will be drop off and pick up .... though that’s outdoors this time of the year.

I think it's going to be incredibly difficult to keep the very young pupils in junior/infants distanced, it will be like herding cats!!



Yep, so what. The current science and statistics show children are at almost no risk from the disease and very poor spreaders.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 2:18 pm 
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Varsity Way wrote:
SaintK wrote:
Varsity Way wrote:
The schooL letter

Which education aauthority is the school in if you don't mins telling us?


Cornwall and Isles of Scilly



That is particularly low risk - barely anyone down there has it.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 2:19 pm 
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DragsterDriver wrote:
juddy wrote:
sockwithaticket wrote:
Jim Lahey wrote:
In NI school is out until September.
My eldest is going into P1 and we’ve already been told shit like she’s only going to be in half a day, no toys in the classroom, no storytime, no playing in the playground etc.
Certainly puts a massive downer on what should be a happy period of her life. Just hope the scars of social distancing don’t turn a generation of young kids into socially impaired introverts.


:lol:

That's some impressive catastrophising hyperbole considering we're only a couple of months in. If they'd been kept apart for years you might have a genuine concern.

Also introversion is about generating energy from time alone and being tired out by interaction, a preference for solitude. It's not being awkward or shy or incapable of socially interacting. Generally considered an innate trait rather than something developed.

Trauma can impact on a person's social development. An extended exposure to the current atmosphere of anxiety and abnormality will be traumatic for some children.


Away from the middle class rugby community a lot of kids are stuck home with day-drinking parents and not being homeschooled.


Course, middle class rugby community are perfect parents :roll:


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 2:31 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
SaintK wrote:
bimboman wrote:
SaintK wrote:
bimboman wrote:
My year 6 goes back, my year 4 stays at home.

The school as I’ve said has pretty useless over the last couple of months (senco aside). So have no expectations, other than the proper socialising for finishing school in year 6.

All the statistics and science point to it being very low risk.

For whom? The children, parents or the teachers or all three?



All three. The hardest bit will be drop off and pick up .... though that’s outdoors this time of the year.

I think it's going to be incredibly difficult to keep the very young pupils in junior/infants distanced, it will be like herding cats!!



Yep, so what. The current science and statistics show children are at almost no risk from the disease and very poor spreaders.


This is interesting/counter-intuitive. Can you throw up a link?


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 2:35 pm 
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henry wrote:
This is interesting/counter-intuitive. Can you throw up a link?


https://news.sky.com/story/coronavirus- ... 9-11980568


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 2:37 pm 
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Quote:
This is interesting/counter-intuitive. Can you throw up a link?



It is something our scientists have reiterated time and again during their daily presentations. Also it seems viruses spread more from symptomatic people than covid thread carries dozens of links regarding that.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 2:45 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
SaintK wrote:
bimboman wrote:
SaintK wrote:
bimboman wrote:
My year 6 goes back, my year 4 stays at home.

The school as I’ve said has pretty useless over the last couple of months (senco aside). So have no expectations, other than the proper socialising for finishing school in year 6.

All the statistics and science point to it being very low risk.

For whom? The children, parents or the teachers or all three?



All three. The hardest bit will be drop off and pick up .... though that’s outdoors this time of the year.

I think it's going to be incredibly difficult to keep the very young pupils in junior/infants distanced, it will be like herding cats!!



Yep, so what. The current science and statistics show children are at almost no risk from the disease and very poor spreaders.

.........and there will be a lot of parents not so well read or armed with the superior knowledge that you clearly possess


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 2:51 pm 
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Quote:
and there will be a lot of parents not so well read or armed with the superior knowledge that you clearly possess




It’s not “superior” anything, it’s just general knowledge currently around the issue. People were happy to believe the scientists and lock down, why are they suddenly not believing the same scientists ?

There’s lots of parents that can’t even prioritise feeding their children over Scratch cars and booze, I don’t think we should use that as a reason to remove all children from parents.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 2:55 pm 
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Raggs wrote:
henry wrote:
This is interesting/counter-intuitive. Can you throw up a link?


https://news.sky.com/story/coronavirus- ... 9-11980568



Interesting. Will have a read. The little buggers appear prolific germ and virus spreaders in most other ways.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2020 3:03 pm 
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Mine is in his transition year and sats are cancelled, so they'll be doing very little and will most likely be taught outside all day.
They're being put into pods of 15 with all 15 families told to notify school if any family member is covid sick. He'll be happy as long as there are some good footballers in his 'bubble' who can play self distanced soccer, and a couple of his preferred girls.
Before and after school clubs have been cancelled from 1st June.


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