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PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2017 1:56 pm 
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Newby1 wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
Newby1 wrote:
Just got back from 18 days trekking in Nepal. Great time, and I avoided the rain seeing as it was monsoon season. My legs are definitely getting late onset tired now I'm back though!

:o

How did you go? Get over the pass? And... no rain? really? I've seen photos of terrible flooding in Kathmandu. If you managed to miss that then I'm impressed and jealous :lol:


Pretty well, its the first big trek I've done in 8 years and first trek at all in 2!

I got to Thorong La pass fine. I got very bad headaches on the way back down to Muktinath though.

I woke up at 5 every morning to leave at 5.30 and arrive at the next place by 1pm. It rained every night and about half the afternoons, but only twice whilst I was walking!


Niiiiice :thumbup:

you utter bastard.

That drag down to Muktinath is horrible, isn't it? I hated that... got up to the pass well enough but from there down was hell.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2017 1:58 pm 
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danny_fitz wrote:
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Going to be near Winchester for a few days in August - any recommendations on the best stretch of the South Downs way?


From Winchester you can do the first leg of the SDW to Exon, roughly about 13 miles or so, once you cross over the M3 you climb up the south downs and it is a very pleasant walk though woodland, countryside, twee villages and farms. There are a few boozers enroute for refreshments although the Shoe Inn in Exon is worth having lunch/dinner in, lovely spot by the river and the village itself is lovely.

Sounds ideal, cheers.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2017 2:11 pm 
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guy smiley wrote:
Newby1 wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
Newby1 wrote:
Just got back from 18 days trekking in Nepal. Great time, and I avoided the rain seeing as it was monsoon season. My legs are definitely getting late onset tired now I'm back though!

:o

How did you go? Get over the pass? And... no rain? really? I've seen photos of terrible flooding in Kathmandu. If you managed to miss that then I'm impressed and jealous :lol:


Pretty well, its the first big trek I've done in 8 years and first trek at all in 2!

I got to Thorong La pass fine. I got very bad headaches on the way back down to Muktinath though.

I woke up at 5 every morning to leave at 5.30 and arrive at the next place by 1pm. It rained every night and about half the afternoons, but only twice whilst I was walking!


Niiiiice :thumbup:

you utter bastard.

That drag down to Muktinath is horrible, isn't it? I hated that... got up to the pass well enough but from there down was hell.


I had a plan ad kept to it. Kept the worst of the rain off me! One of the 2 days of rain was when I was supposed to be at Poon Hill. I trekked a double day from Ghasa to Ghorepani in order to get there a day early and had lovely views that day!

Its bad, and I think the altitude hit a little on the way down. Hardest 4 hours of the entire trek. I got in at 11.30 and crashed for several hours before resurfacing for my Dal Bhatt power.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2017 7:03 pm 
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croyals wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
croyals wrote:
Going to be near Winchester for a few days in August - any recommendations on the best stretch of the South Downs way?


From Winchester you can do the first leg of the SDW to Exon, roughly about 13 miles or so, once you cross over the M3 you climb up the south downs and it is a very pleasant walk though woodland, countryside, twee villages and farms. There are a few boozers enroute for refreshments although the Shoe Inn in Exon is worth having lunch/dinner in, lovely spot by the river and the village itself is lovely.

Sounds ideal, cheers.


of couse that 13 miles will only account for one of your mornings ;)


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 20, 2017 7:41 pm 
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Just moved back to RSA and doing lots of hiking in the Cape Mountains. There is a new route called Rim of Africa, 650km in 12 weeks, which can be hiked in stages or as a thru-hike. It's by arrangement only with limited places and leads through protected wilderness areas and private property. I did most of the Cederberg and Kouebokkeveld this winter. Definitely plan to do the thru hike in the next couple of years.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 12:14 am 
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OptimisticJock wrote:
pjm1 wrote:
cubby boi wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
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Also bear in mi d that I'll be wild camping and carrying a pack of around 12 KG. ..

12kg???
You sound a bit underpacked tbh.


Well that's what I'm hoping to keep it to...
I'll be taking my terra nova jupiter bivi which is only 800g and my sleeping bag is about the same. My 50-60l pack is 1.3KG. I'll stay dressed if I get cold. I'm hoping I won't have to carry too much water or food at any one time as shops and toilets are relatively frequent. I'll defiantly be roughing it.

What would be a normal pack weight for this kind of trip then?


You might want a bit of redundancy in that pack...

What if your sleeping bag gets wet? Is it down? Nice and light and packable, but when wet it's useless and you won't have much option to dry it en route, I presume? That's your biggest risk, straight up.

What if your boots get wet? They probably will at some point. Do you have a spare pair of *something*?

Stay dressed if you're cold. What if your gear is wet - see wet sleeping bag problem again.

How will you dry your gear in a bivy if it does chuck it down?

Sorry, but I do a lot of walking in Scotland (especially the West) and apart from the sodding midges at this time of year, the biggest issue is water ingress - into everything. My down bag is packed very carefully, but I need to be gettig into it naked or with guaranteed dry clothes if I'm doing a multi day.

Speaking of which, I haven't walked properly for about 6 months. Trip on Friday is a 4-bagger - a nice little warmer-upper on Saturday (1km ascent) and then a bit of a bitch on Sunday - 3 hills with 2.4km of ascent (start at bloody sea level) over 24km. Should be good fun, but I'm expecting to be shattered by the end of it. We're boating along the loch to get to the start point too... so much room for utter disaster at basically every turn :)

It shouldn't be if you're waterproofing everything.


So what happens when you're sweating like a rapist inside your fully waterproofed clothes? And said clothes are what you'll be sleeping in? What about if you fall when crossing a river - will waterproofed clothes help then?

I've topped boots too many times and also woken up to find somehow, some water had found its way into my tent and soaked the corner of my sleeping bag. It's amazing how quickly that leads to the whole sodding thing getting damp.

If you can 100% guarantee that your kit will stay dry then great and more power to you. I'd rather take a spare set (or two) of clothes and shoes, just in case. And for multiday, I just don't see the benefits of down over a good synthetic bag - yes, you're using up more space, but down's just not worth the risk if you 100% have to have a warm sleeping bag, night after night.

Dry bags are easy to puncture as well, let's not forget - riskier in winter with crampons and axes, but still all too easy at any time.

Edited to add: all packed for our 3 day trip tomorrow. Boat and outboard loaded into car and nearly have all the kit in too. Just waiting for the last of the gear to dry properly before taking it off the radiator tomorrow morning.

Hope I remember and don't just rush out, leaving my socks, climbing trousers and top on the heater!


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 6:22 pm 
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Well that adventure was pretty sodding difficult. Outboard died, so we had to row 8km back at the end with all of our gear.

The walk itself was fine (if long: nearly a 15 hour day on day 2) but if only it had just been a "walk". Unroped climbs of up to 15m per pitch (which were described as "steep scrambles) and a host of dynamic moves required on the less exposed bits to boot.

Shat myself a bit on the 3km ridge walk too - next time I think I might just opt for a nice steady (long) walk!


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 6:51 pm 
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BlackMac wrote:
Heading off on the West Highland Way tomorrow. did it many moons ago but this time I am taking the good lady with me. TBF she has put in far more training than myself so I will probably be dawdling along in her wake. Weather looks fair for the whole week so that will be half the battle


Had an absolutely fabulous week. We must be among the handful of people who have walked the entirety of the WHW in continual 25 degree sunshine. You forget how utterly spectacular the west coast of Scotland can be.
I did also forget how brutal the last 6 mile stretch of Loch Lomond is.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 9:36 pm 
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Fcuk you BM. When I did it two years back it pished down bar about 5 minutes. And the first time I did it we had about 30 mins of sun. :lol:

Anyway... done some god hikes on my travels this year.. overland track in tazzie, Abel Tasman, quarry trail and inca trail in Peru. Looking to do the O in Patagonia in September if the authorities will let us (currently a lot of snow) and Kilimanjaro in Feb to look forward to.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 9:40 pm 
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HKCJ wrote:
Fcuk you BM. When I did it two years back it pished down bar about 5 minutes. And the first time I did it we had about 30 mins of sun. :lol:

Anyway... done some god hikes on my travels this year.. overland track in tazzie, Abel Tasman, quarry trail and inca trail in Peru. Looking to do the O in Patagonia in September if the authorities will let us (currently a lot of snow) and Kilimanjaro in Feb to look forward to.


30 mins of summer, you lucky, lucky bastard, you were there for the whole of summer.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2017 11:06 am 
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pjm1 wrote:
OptimisticJock wrote:
pjm1 wrote:
cubby boi wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
]
12kg???
You sound a bit underpacked tbh.


Well that's what I'm hoping to keep it to...
I'll be taking my terra nova jupiter bivi which is only 800g and my sleeping bag is about the same. My 50-60l pack is 1.3KG. I'll stay dressed if I get cold. I'm hoping I won't have to carry too much water or food at any one time as shops and toilets are relatively frequent. I'll defiantly be roughing it.

What would be a normal pack weight for this kind of trip then?


You might want a bit of redundancy in that pack...

What if your sleeping bag gets wet? Is it down? Nice and light and packable, but when wet it's useless and you won't have much option to dry it en route, I presume? That's your biggest risk, straight up.

What if your boots get wet? They probably will at some point. Do you have a spare pair of *something*?

Stay dressed if you're cold. What if your gear is wet - see wet sleeping bag problem again.

How will you dry your gear in a bivy if it does chuck it down?

Sorry, but I do a lot of walking in Scotland (especially the West) and apart from the sodding midges at this time of year, the biggest issue is water ingress - into everything. My down bag is packed very carefully, but I need to be gettig into it naked or with guaranteed dry clothes if I'm doing a multi day.

Speaking of which, I haven't walked properly for about 6 months. Trip on Friday is a 4-bagger - a nice little warmer-upper on Saturday (1km ascent) and then a bit of a bitch on Sunday - 3 hills with 2.4km of ascent (start at bloody sea level) over 24km. Should be good fun, but I'm expecting to be shattered by the end of it. We're boating along the loch to get to the start point too... so much room for utter disaster at basically every turn :)

It shouldn't be if you're waterproofing everything.


So what happens when you're sweating like a rapist inside your fully waterproofed clothes? And said clothes are what you'll be sleeping in? What about if you fall when crossing a river - will waterproofed clothes help then?

I've topped boots too many times and also woken up to find somehow, some water had found its way into my tent and soaked the corner of my sleeping bag. It's amazing how quickly that leads to the whole sodding thing getting damp.

If you can 100% guarantee that your kit will stay dry then great and more power to you. I'd rather take a spare set (or two) of clothes and shoes, just in case. And for multiday, I just don't see the benefits of down over a good synthetic bag - yes, you're using up more space, but down's just not worth the risk if you 100% have to have a warm sleeping bag, night after night.

Dry bags are easy to puncture as well, let's not forget - riskier in winter with crampons and axes, but still all too easy at any time.

Edited to add: all packed for our 3 day trip tomorrow. Boat and outboard loaded into car and nearly have all the kit in too. Just waiting for the last of the gear to dry properly before taking it off the radiator tomorrow morning.

Hope I remember and don't just rush out, leaving my socks, climbing trousers and top on the heater!

:lol: chill out sweet cheeks, I purposefully highlighted the part about getting in everywhere. Nobody mentioned cutting about in Gary goretex all day you dafty :lol:


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2017 9:43 pm 
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In that case I have genuinely no idea what you're talking about. You either make your gear properly waterproof and sweat buckets or you have problems with water ingress when it pours. No magic bullet sadly.

I prefer getting a bit wet from the rain and then having the chance to dry out when it stops (e.g. In May) but we're all different.

Hence my issue with down bags (yes I have one!)


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 12:27 am 
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pjm1 wrote:
In that case I have genuinely no idea what you're talking about. You either make your gear properly waterproof and sweat buckets or you have problems with water ingress when it pours. No magic bullet sadly.

I prefer getting a bit wet from the rain and then having the chance to dry out when it stops (e.g. In May) but we're all different.

Hence my issue with down bags (yes I have one!)

Huh? There's kit out there that keeps you utterly dry if a touch sweaty in a monsoon. We're talking in the UK here. It doesn't need to be that pricey if you shop around and don't mind last year's styles.

And what's your problem with down bags. If you have a decent bivvy and pack and know how to bag things up, your sleeping bag should never get wet.

You're doing this wrong.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:23 am 
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happyhooker wrote:
pjm1 wrote:
In that case I have genuinely no idea what you're talking about. You either make your gear properly waterproof and sweat buckets or you have problems with water ingress when it pours. No magic bullet sadly.

I prefer getting a bit wet from the rain and then having the chance to dry out when it stops (e.g. In May) but we're all different.

Hence my issue with down bags (yes I have one!)

Huh? There's kit out there that keeps you utterly dry if a touch sweaty in a monsoon. We're talking in the UK here. It doesn't need to be that pricey if you shop around and don't mind last year's styles.

And what's your problem with down bags. If you have a decent bivvy and pack and know how to bag things up, your sleeping bag should never get wet.

You're doing this wrong.

Why using a down bag? Get a hollow synthetic fibre that will stay warm when wet in a worse case situation. Could be a life saver.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 6:42 am 
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happyhooker wrote:
pjm1 wrote:
In that case I have genuinely no idea what you're talking about. You either make your gear properly waterproof and sweat buckets or you have problems with water ingress when it pours. No magic bullet sadly.

I prefer getting a bit wet from the rain and then having the chance to dry out when it stops (e.g. In May) but we're all different.

Hence my issue with down bags (yes I have one!)

Huh? There's kit out there that keeps you utterly dry if a touch sweaty in a monsoon. We're talking in the UK here. It doesn't need to be that pricey if you shop around and don't mind last year's styles.

And what's your problem with down bags. If you have a decent bivvy and pack and know how to bag things up, your sleeping bag should never get wet.

You're doing this wrong.


I know this is par for this particular forum but there's a serious lack of comprehension (or simply bothering to read) here. The bold bit is my whole point - when doing fairly serious exertion (400+ cals/hr) in our typical climate you either keep the rain out and a bucket load of sweat in, or you compromise in terms of waterproofing and go for something far more breathable but far lower HH (e.g. Rab's vapourise).

Cubby was originally asking about taking virtually no spare gear and having a down bag, hence the reason I was trying (and clearly failing) to explain that with limited spare gear he risks being rather damp when he gets into his bag.

I have a cheap synthetic bag which would be my bag of choice for serious multi day where I'm carrying everything (ie not returning to fixed tent location) - just because it's more reliable, albeit a load bigger in the pack.

HTH?


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 2:30 pm 
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I'm planning on doing Ben Nevis in May. Will I need crampons/ice axe? I know it's required in winter.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 6:40 pm 
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Zakar wrote:
I'm planning on doing Ben Nevis in May. Will I need crampons/ice axe? I know it's required in winter.

Not if you're doing the tourist path.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 6:48 pm 
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happyhooker wrote:
Zakar wrote:
I'm planning on doing Ben Nevis in May. Will I need crampons/ice axe? I know it's required in winter.

Not if you're doing the tourist path.


How hard is the North Face?


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 6:56 pm 
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Zakar wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
Zakar wrote:
I'm planning on doing Ben Nevis in May. Will I need crampons/ice axe? I know it's required in winter.

Not if you're doing the tourist path.


How hard is the North Face?

Not sure in may tbh. I've only ever done it in midwinter.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 8:23 pm 
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Unfortunately the Otter trail in SA is fully booked for when we want to go so we will be doing the Fannie Botha (fnar fnar) and possibly Fish Canyon. Any boredies done these?


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 8:31 pm 
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HKCJ wrote:
Unfortunately the Otter trail in SA is fully booked for when we want to go so we will be doing the Fannie Botha (fnar fnar) and possibly Fish Canyon. Any boredies done these?


Have been to Fish River Canyon although I have not done the trek along the bottom. From what I understand it is only open to very limited numbers each season so you need to book early.

Looks epic

Image


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 9:30 pm 
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happyhooker wrote:
Zakar wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
Zakar wrote:
I'm planning on doing Ben Nevis in May. Will I need crampons/ice axe? I know it's required in winter.

Not if you're doing the tourist path.


How hard is the North Face?

Not sure in may tbh. I've only ever done it in midwinter.


Fair enough. Might just do the pony track if there is going to be snow and ice around.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:11 am 
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Zakar wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
Zakar wrote:
I'm planning on doing Ben Nevis in May. Will I need crampons/ice axe? I know it's required in winter.

Not if you're doing the tourist path.


How hard is the North Face?


Totally depends on your route and whether you take a difficult gully or an easy one! There are heaps of routes up that side of the Ben, from the Ledge route (easier), Tower ridge (Diff climb and gear recommended) or a very nice ascent via Carn Mor Dearg (one of my faves). The latter takes you away from the Ben and up its neighbour. Having only done this in winter, I can't say what it'll be like in May, but bear in mind it's basically a 40-odd degree slope all the way up to the ridge (about 400m of vertical) and if you slip, you'll be approaching some fair speed by the time your head brains itself on the rocks at the bottom. On that basis, I'd take walking crampons, ice axe and usual safety stuff. Once you summit CMD and head along the arete to the backside of the Ben, the snow (even at that time of year) can be pretty deep. Having said that, the approach up the Ben from the arete is just a rounded hump so very safe and benign - it's just a drag up that final 100m or so.

Far better than the tourist trail which is everything I dislike about walking!


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:19 pm 
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pjm1 wrote:
Zakar wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
Zakar wrote:
I'm planning on doing Ben Nevis in May. Will I need crampons/ice axe? I know it's required in winter.

Not if you're doing the tourist path.


How hard is the North Face?


Totally depends on your route and whether you take a difficult gully or an easy one! There are heaps of routes up that side of the Ben, from the Ledge route (easier), Tower ridge (Diff climb and gear recommended) or a very nice ascent via Carn Mor Dearg (one of my faves). The latter takes you away from the Ben and up its neighbour. Having only done this in winter, I can't say what it'll be like in May, but bear in mind it's basically a 40-odd degree slope all the way up to the ridge (about 400m of vertical) and if you slip, you'll be approaching some fair speed by the time your head brains itself on the rocks at the bottom. On that basis, I'd take walking crampons, ice axe and usual safety stuff. Once you summit CMD and head along the arete to the backside of the Ben, the snow (even at that time of year) can be pretty deep. Having said that, the approach up the Ben from the arete is just a rounded hump so very safe and benign - it's just a drag up that final 100m or so.

Far better than the tourist trail which is everything I dislike about walking!


Well, I'm taking the Mrs, so anything too extreme is a non starter at this stage. We'll be doing a guided glacier hike in Iceland in a few weeks, so I'll see on how she handles the crampons/ice axe. If we need to do the pony trail, then so be it.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:23 pm 
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HKCJ wrote:
Unfortunately the Otter trail in SA is fully booked for when we want to go so we will be doing the Fannie Botha (fnar fnar) and possibly Fish Canyon. Any boredies done these?


yeah I've done the Otter Trail, about 10 years ago

was a bit cold and boring tbf, very scenic though - main prob was pain in the neck sister in law who whinged about everything and anything for 2 days until she left early, to everyones relief (she was also unfit as feck and couldn't carry her smallish rucksack)

tbh I'm not the long distance hiking sort of person, I get a bit bored with 'ooh isn't this a pretty bay / beach / rock' as all seems much like the previous 247 pretty bay / beach / rocks I saw.

If you in SA may I recommend driving up the Sani pass into Lesotho, the whole thing can be done in a day and I found it far more fun & scenic, I know you like your mountains and stuff and the Drakensburg are pretty cool


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:34 pm 
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Booked a long weekend in Glencoe with a couple of mates for later this year - staying at the Clachaig, yeah.

Will NOT be doing Aonach Eagach, will probably do Bidean. Any must do's?


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 7:00 pm 
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I did an hour an a half through one mountain near Citrusdal with my two kids. Lots of scrambling and a bit of climbing. Does that count


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:35 pm 
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slick wrote:
Booked a long weekend in Glencoe with a couple of mates for later this year - staying at the Clachaig, yeah.

Will NOT be doing Aonach Eagach, will probably do Bidean. Any must do's?


Just enjoy it! Stay off the expanses and keep to ridges as far as you can - Coe is dangerous when the snow comes.

Might be heading out to Aonach Eagach next month - fancy doing something a bit juicy before the snow disappears. The alternative is the North half of the Cuillin as that'd also make a fab winter scramble.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 10:54 am 
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pjm1 wrote:
slick wrote:
Booked a long weekend in Glencoe with a couple of mates for later this year - staying at the Clachaig, yeah.

Will NOT be doing Aonach Eagach, will probably do Bidean. Any must do's?


Just enjoy it! Stay off the expanses and keep to ridges as far as you can - Coe is dangerous when the snow comes.

Might be heading out to Aonach Eagach next month - fancy doing something a bit juicy before the snow disappears. The alternative is the North half of the Cuillin as that'd also make a fab winter scramble.


I've done the Aonach Eagach before, hence the never again. To be fair I was woefully underprepared for it. Just slowly building now, might look at it again in a couple of years.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2018 11:39 am 
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At last. Trip to Glencoe begins tomorrow morning.

Weather looks OK Friday and pretty good Saturday so plan is a low level walk tomorrow then Bidean on Saturday. Can't bloody wait.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2018 8:57 pm 
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slick wrote:
At last. Trip to Glencoe begins tomorrow morning.

Weather looks OK Friday and pretty good Saturday so plan is a low level walk tomorrow then Bidean on Saturday. Can't bloody wait.

Bidean is stunning. Which route are you taking?


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 2:48 pm 
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So, booked my euro tunnel, camp site and mountain hut accommodation in Chamonix. Ascents of Grand Paradiso and Mt Blanc are on the cards.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 3:25 pm 
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danny_fitz wrote:
So, booked my euro tunnel, camp site and mountain hut accommodation in Chamonix. Ascents of Grand Paradiso and Mt Blanc are on the cards.

Gran paradiso is the embodiment of 'any fat tourist'

Les dents du midi are worth a look.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 4:00 pm 
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happyhooker wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
So, booked my euro tunnel, camp site and mountain hut accommodation in Chamonix. Ascents of Grand Paradiso and Mt Blanc are on the cards.

Gran paradiso is the embodiment of 'any fat tourist'

Les dents du midi are worth a look.


Well, I have the wife in tow who is not a hard core seasoned Alpinist like me so need to start with the basics. The Eiger can wait till next year.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 4:13 pm 
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slick wrote:
At last. Trip to Glencoe begins tomorrow morning.

Weather looks OK Friday and pretty good Saturday so plan is a low level walk tomorrow then Bidean on Saturday. Can't bloody wait.


Sorry, didn't see this.

We went up through Coire nan Lochan then down through the Lost Valley.

We ended up doing Buachaille Etive Mor on the Friday which was also stunning. Great weather all weekend and plenty of beers in the Clachaig. Just a brilliant weekend.

Hoping for a weekend in the Cairngorms in May.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 4:16 pm 
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slick wrote:
At last. Trip to Glencoe begins tomorrow morning.

Weather looks OK Friday and pretty good Saturday so plan is a low level walk tomorrow then Bidean on Saturday. Can't bloody wait.


Off this Friday to do Suilven then got 3 days in Glencore. Forecast is -5 and snow :lol:

Keen to do Arran circuit and Skye in the next few months with a couple of mates who
are also unemployed.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 4:22 pm 
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HKCJ wrote:
slick wrote:
At last. Trip to Glencoe begins tomorrow morning.

Weather looks OK Friday and pretty good Saturday so plan is a low level walk tomorrow then Bidean on Saturday. Can't bloody wait.


Off this Friday to do Suilven then got 3 days in Glencore. Forecast is -5 and snow :lol:

Keen to do Arran circuit and Skye in the next few months with a couple of mates who
are also unemployed.


If you are ever looking for someone to go with let me know. Bafflingly none of my mates up here are interested so a bit restricted to a couple of times a year getting mates up from down south!

In saying that, you won't get me anywhere near snow and much of Skye sounds terrifying!


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 4:23 pm 
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slick wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
slick wrote:
At last. Trip to Glencoe begins tomorrow morning.

Weather looks OK Friday and pretty good Saturday so plan is a low level walk tomorrow then Bidean on Saturday. Can't bloody wait.


Off this Friday to do Suilven then got 3 days in Glencore. Forecast is -5 and snow :lol:

Keen to do Arran circuit and Skye in the next few months with a couple of mates who
are also unemployed.


If you are ever looking for someone to go with let me know. Bafflingly none of my mates up here are interested so a bit restricted to a couple of times a year getting mates up from down south!

In saying that, you won't get me anywhere near snow and much of Skye sounds terrifying!


Skye's grand.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 4:52 pm 
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Location: Auld Reekie
slick wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
slick wrote:
At last. Trip to Glencoe begins tomorrow morning.

Weather looks OK Friday and pretty good Saturday so plan is a low level walk tomorrow then Bidean on Saturday. Can't bloody wait.


Off this Friday to do Suilven then got 3 days in Glencore. Forecast is -5 and snow :lol:

Keen to do Arran circuit and Skye in the next few months with a couple of mates who
are also unemployed.


If you are ever looking for someone to go with let me know. Bafflingly none of my mates up here are interested so a bit restricted to a couple of times a year getting mates up from down south!

In saying that, you won't get me anywhere near snow and much of Skye sounds terrifying!


Will do. There’s actually a very good group on Facebook called Iona’s adventures that’s really good for meeting people who are planning various hikes and similar if you’re ever looking for some to do. About 1300 people on it now so something every weekend.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 4:54 pm 
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HKCJ wrote:
slick wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
slick wrote:
At last. Trip to Glencoe begins tomorrow morning.

Weather looks OK Friday and pretty good Saturday so plan is a low level walk tomorrow then Bidean on Saturday. Can't bloody wait.


Off this Friday to do Suilven then got 3 days in Glencore. Forecast is -5 and snow :lol:

Keen to do Arran circuit and Skye in the next few months with a couple of mates who
are also unemployed.


If you are ever looking for someone to go with let me know. Bafflingly none of my mates up here are interested so a bit restricted to a couple of times a year getting mates up from down south!

In saying that, you won't get me anywhere near snow and much of Skye sounds terrifying!


Will do. There’s actually a very good group on Facebook called Iona’s adventures that’s really good for meeting people who are planning various hikes and similar if you’re ever looking for some to do. About 1300 people on it now so something every weekend.


Thanks, I'll take a look :thumbup:


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